Wondrous Words Wednesday: Greece

I had completely forgotten about BermudaOnion‘s weekly meme, but I was looking for a way of sharing new, beautiful words and I stumbled across it again. A meme after my own heart (if my blog’s title is in any way significant, and it is!). So here we go!

This week’s words all come from museums and archaeological sites around Greece. Unfortunately I cannot give you the words in context, because I didn’t jot the context down, but most of them had no context whatsoever.

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Chryselephantine: adj. (of ancient Greek sculpture) overlaid with gold and ivory.

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Ladle: noun (1) a large long-handled spoon with a cup-shaped bowl, used for serving soup or sauce. (2) a container for transporting molten metal in a foundry.

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Codpiece: noun a pouch to cover the genitals on a pair of man’s breeches, worn in the 15th and 16th centuries.

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Light well: noun an open area or vertical shaft in the centre of a building, typically roofed with glass.

(All definitions are taken from the Concise Oxford English Dictionary © 2008 via WordReference.com)

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13 comments on “Wondrous Words Wednesday: Greece

  1. @Care, Suko and Southern Fiber: thanks! I’ll be sure to check out your blogs!

    (@Care: not much to be nervous about, actually. Have a look here)

  2. @ Joy Weese Moll (and Bermudaonion): I actually use a ladle a lot too 😉 It happens, now and again, that a very common word is new for me — especially when out of context as a ladle in an archaeology museum!

  3. How interesting that Old English codd meant bag and then in Middle English it meant testicles…
    I guess it really does makes sense now. THANKS for that link!

  4. Thank you for the link, Care. Unfortunately that doesn’t seem to be the solution 😦 I’ll have to look into the issue.
    I’m glad you liked the etymology snippet!

  5. For some reason, the “Website” box is not there anymore. But I guess I only need to log out and add the link manually when I comment.

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